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Master’s Project- What I learned, Part 1

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Tips for filming:

1. Get to know your subject before-  I knew long before I had even scheduled to meet with the people I would be interviewing that I would need to get to know them before I ever actually set up a camera. You want them to be comfortable with you and to have an understanding of what it is you are doing. Though I was working under a very tight deadline and didn’t have much time, I made sure to meet with them all at least once before beginning the actual filming process.

2. Get to know your equipment before- This was huge for me. I took a basic photography course a few years ago and interned with a news station one summer, but that really wasn’t enough to prepare me. I needed to have a really good grasp of the equipment I had been given for this project, and I learned that lesson the hard way a few times. Make sure you understand all of the menu options, buttons, and functions on your camera. Practice using the tripod and practice shooting in low and bright light, just in case. If there are going to be any problems with your equipment, you want to discover those beforehand.

3. Learn to improvise- Unfortunately, no matter how much you know your equipment and how much you practice, there is a chance there still might be a few bumps along the way. I learned this the hard way, too, but in the end, it all worked out.

4. Bring a notebook- I would advise you to bring a notebook to your initial interview so that you can jot down notes about the person or people you’ve just met. This will help when you get home and want to begin coming up with the story for each video. I wrote down the barebones of our conversation, and then when I got home, used those notes to come up with the questions I would ask in the real interview session. As a journalist, my notebook has always been a sort of safety blanket, I guess. It has also helped me to tell the person I’m interviewing that we will be talking about many of the same things we spoke about in our previous meeting. I have learned that can make them feel a little more comfortable in front of the camera.

If your first meeting takes place in their home, it’s also a great idea to write down things you notice in their house. Do they have lots of family photos on the walls? Are their flowers everywhere? Do they have awards, trophies, or medals sitting on a shelf? These are things you can talk about in your next interview, either to break the ice or to show the viewers who this person is. These are things you can use as b-roll, too.

5. Speaking of b-roll– When you hear someone say take lots and lots of b-roll, listen to them. When you think you have enough, you probably don’t, so just shoot another 10 or 15 minutes. You’ll thank me later. I promise. Also, make sure you shoots lots of different scenes and angles, as it can become boring for the viewer to see the same scenes over and over again. One of the main reasons we use b-roll is to give the viewer something else to look at besides the person being interviewed. It holds their attention a little longer, but if you keep showing the same b-roll, it probably won’t.

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Other things to know:

1. Always record with a separate audio recorder. It will sound a lot clearer and cleaner than the built in audio recorder on your camera.

2. Record a minute of background audio. This just means that you should record the background noise without anyone speaking in the place you are filming. You can then lay that audio track under all of the others when editing. It will make the jumps between the b-roll and interview more seamless.

3. Look for a good depth of field. Choose to interview your source in an area that has some depth behind them. Whatever you do, don’t interview them in front of a wall. I’m speaking from experience.

4. Bring extra batteries. That’s a no brainer, right? Wrong.

 

Good luck!

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The Finished Products

Interested in learning about my classmates’ websites? Check them out in Elizabeth Manning’s blog post about them!

Don’t forget to visit her website, http://www.foodinsecurity.ua.edu, too! Her website focuses on food insecurity in the city of Tuscaloosa, which is a serious problem that is so often overlooked. Elizabeth’s goal for her site is that it will spark discussion among opinion leaders who can make real change and take steps to find a solution. This website is also helpful to those who don’t know what food insecurity is, and for those who are interested in getting involved to help those who are affected.

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Food for Thought

As I’ve discussed regularly, I have spent the past year working on a website focusing on food insecurity in Tuscaloosa, Ala. What I haven’t mentioned quite so often, though, is that while I was working on my site, six other people were also putting their hearts and souls into websites on different issues and subjects in Tuscaloosa.

I am still amazed sometimes at the well-rounded, intelligent, caring, and hard-working group that I am blessed to be surrounded by every weekday. In a week and a half, we all move to Anniston together to spend a summer chasing sources and writing hard-hitting leads. I cannot explain how thankful I am that I get to spend the summer with this group of people.

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Laura Monroe — Caregivers

Monroe has worked with five caregivers for Alzheimer’s patients for the past year. She filmed the caregivers in their natural elements and had them discuss…

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Weekend in Monroeville, Alabama

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“Until I feared I would lose it, I never loved to read. One does not love breathing.”–Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird is one of those books that resonates with readers in different ways. It’s one of those stories in which a reader might discover one meaning the first time they read it, and then discover another the next. Many of us have a favorite line or quote, and whether or not we’ve read it once or one hundred times, we can remember the first time we read it. It speaks to something inside of us, pulling on a memory, thought, or feeling.

The stories in this book have meant something different to me each time I’ve read them, but the quote above has always stopped me for a few moments before turning the page. It reminds me to take nothing for granted, and at the same time reminds me that I so very often do just that.

It has been more of a problem lately than before, and in the whirlwind that is graduate school, I know why. I blame this lack of appreciation for the small things on stress, and yes, I realize that is, as my mother would say, nobody’s fault but my own. My attention is on projects, papers, and presentations, and I forget to take the time to just be thankful for all I’ve been given. Deadline after deadline cause me to forget to stop, take a deep breath, and be proud of all I have accomplished so far. As this semester comes to a close, my classmates and I are constantly reminding each other that if we could make it this far, we can make it for a few more weeks. Even with those reminders, however, it is hard not to get caught up in the pressure of it all.

A weekend getaway without laptops and worry is the best medicine, and last weekend was a testament to that. Thanks to our wonderful professor Dr. Bragg, who snagged tickets to the sold out event for us months ago, a few classmates and I were able to attend the To Kill a Mockingbird play with her in Monroeville, Alabama. If you haven’t seen this play, I highly recommend it. If you have seen it, I’m sure you would agree with me. The amateur cast is comprised completely of volunteers, but they are extremely talented and passionate. Many of them have been part of the cast for years.

While I was blown away by the play, it was only one of the ingredients for the perfect weekend.

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We drove from Tuscaloosa to Monroeville on Saturday, giving ourselves enough time to visit the historic courthouse for a tour of the museum inside. After having lunch at David’s Catfish House, we visited the site of Truman Capote’s childhood home, and had ice cream at Mel’s Dairy Dream next door.

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Becky, Elizabeth, and I wanted to see as much history as we could while in Monroeville, and after ice cream, we set out on one of the driving tours we had learned of in the museum. We spent an hour or two just admiring old buildings and stopping to read the occasional historical marker. The only thing we had to do was make it back to the courthouse in time to get good seats for the play. Once there, we enjoyed cokes in glass bottles and a perfect spring night that ended with drinks and appetizers at the Prop & Gavel, a restaurant that is right across from the courthouse.

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What made this weekend so special, and maybe even healing, in my case, was the feeling of having nowhere to be and nothing to worry about. On Sunday, we drove back to Tuscaloosa feeling a lot less stressed than we were two days before. As we drove through the countryside, we stopped to take pictures of beautiful plantation homes, old churches, and wildflowers. We left the main road a few times just to drive through small towns we had never seen before. We stopped for ice cream in Marion and had lunch in Centreville.



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Like Harper Lee’s words, this weekend reminded me to appreciate the small things. It often takes losing something to realize how much it meant to you, but this was a different sort of wake up call. This was a reminder of the things I do have, and though I know I’ll probably forget to appreciate them time and time again, I’m thankful I remembered in Monroeville.

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Master’s Project- Have you visited the site?

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The next few posts will be about my recently completed website. I have been working on it for months and it has been an awesome experience. I’m proud of the finished product, but as I mentioned in a previous post, I might not ever stop working on it. It’s a project I can keep adding to, and I can always keep tweaking it to get it exactly the way I want it. The idea of never really being finished might seem stressful to some, but that is the life of a perfectionist. Add that to the passion I have for this topic and you have a never ending project.

While the website is actually finished and will be presented next week to my master’s committee, there are still project requirements that I will be working on this week and into the summer. One of those requirements is an assessment portion of this project. During our Assessing Community Journalism course this Spring, we learned about multiple assessment methods and were asked to choose two methods to assess our websites. I decided to conduct a survey and usability tests using website visitors.

I’m hoping to gain some very helpful results from these tests and surveys. If you are interested in taking the survey, please click the link below.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/BQ89NT3

I’m excited to analyze the results and hope to learn from them so that I can make any needed changes to the website.

Finish Master’s Project: Check.

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If you’ve been following my blog for the last few months you’ll know that I have been diligently working on a website for the graduate program I am in at the University of Alabama. There have been ups and downs, and there were definitely days when I didn’t know if I could pull it off, but I’m happy to announce that the website is now up and running. I’m proud of the finished product, but I highly doubt I’ll ever stop tweaking it. I’ve become far more attached to the topic than I thought I would be, and am honestly hoping to make it a project I continue to work on even after I receive my Master’s degree.

Since it is fairly new, not many people have seen my website, and I don’t know that very many people will ever see it. However, I’ve already been told by a few that it helped them to gain a new perspective. Others have said it was comforting to hear from others who share similar experiences as caregivers. Those comments have made me realize that giving caregivers a platform to share their stories is important, and I will gladly continue to do it if I can.

So, here it is: www.caregivers.ua.edu. Please check it out and let me know what you think!

While you are on the site, you will notice that there are four videos that focus on four different families. The interviews are with the caregivers, and they will give you a glimpse into their lives. Some of their experiences are similar and some of their experiences are not, but the point is that they are not alone.

I have two main goals for this project: first, I hope that people who do not know much about Alzheimer’s or the effects it has on the entire family will gain a new perspective, causing them to see the importance of raising awareness of this disease. Caregivers of those with Alzheimer’s have been called “hidden caregivers” because they don’t speak out. This is often because they don’t want to embarrass their loved one or because they want others to remember them as they were before the disease. It is sometimes because they don’t want to sound like they are complaining because they gladly carry the burden of being a caregiver to those they love. However, the only way to shake the stigma that comes with Alzheimer’s is by sharing these experiences, which will also show others the importance of finding a cure.

My second goal for this site is that it will help caregivers feel more connected by listening to stories of those who are facing the same difficulties that they face. It’s also comforting just to talk to someone about it sometimes. When I thanked one of the caregivers for allowing me to tell her story, she said that it was me that needed to be thanked. She said it was just nice to know that someone cared. Those words made all of the hard work worth it.

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12 Things you should know about Alzheimer’s…

imagesThere has been no avoiding the frightening facts and figures behind Alzheimer’s while I have been working on my master’s project, which focuses on the disease and the implications it has on family caregivers. It’s this closeness with the subject and the background information that causes me to forget that not everyone shares this interest with me. Not everyone knows how many people die each year from Alzheimer’s (500,000), or that 1 in 3 seniors dies with this disease. Not everyone knows what it is like to have a family member who has Alzheimer’s, but as the numbers rise, it’s likely that they will one day.

I realize that it’s not that people don’t care, although one caregiver I spoke with said that most people don’t care about something until it affects them or someone close to them. I think people just don’t realize the implications this disease has for everyone. I read an article from the Huffington Post this week that lists 12 things you might not know about Alzheimer’s. I’m going to summarize it below, but feel free to go read the article yourself here.

  1. “Alzheimer’s is a fiscal nightmare.” 
  2. “Rates will quadruple.” Experts say that in the next 35 years, the number of those who will develop Alzheimer’s will quadruple. The article says, “If you’re over 65, you stand a one-in-eight chance of getting the disease. Once you pass 85, your odds jump (or fall) to nearly one-in-two.”
  3. “Alzheimer’s is the third deadliest disease in the U.S.” I’ve seen different reports on this number, but either way it’s in the top ten, and if we can do something to change that number, we need to be doing it.
  4. “Alzheimer’s is endlessly destructive.” The article reminds us that Alzheimer’s does much more than steal a person’s memory. There are other destructive symptoms that develop as the disease progresses. In fact, there are seven stages, often ending with the person losing their ability to control movement.
  5. “There may be many kinds of Alzheimer’s.” Alzheimer’s might be similar to cancer in that there might be many different types, which makes finding a cure even more difficult. The article says, “When John Wayne had cancer, it was called “the cancer.” Now there are dozens of kinds of cancer.”
  6. You can be a “dementia friend.” Some countries are starting programs that train citizens who have jobs that require them to work directly with customers to understand the disease so they can better serve those who have it. This might help clear up the stigmas that follow Alzheimer’s.
  7. “High-tech solutions are coming.” The article says that dementia friendly technology is being developed. The homes of those who have this disease might one day contain technology that allows them to live somewhat more independently than they can today.
  8. “There is even progress on Diagnosis.”
  9. “Big data” may uncover solutions and help solve some of these issues.”
  10. “New Care Models for the 21st Century.” We are learning new ways to train family caregivers so that they are better equipped to take care of their loved one at home. This could mean fewer Alzheimer’s patients in nursing homes, and even less of an expense on the family.
  11. “Prevention Before Cure.” Since we haven’t found a cure yet, some say we should be focused on prevention in the meantime. Diet and exercise can decrease a person’s chances of developing the disease.
  12. “An unexpected advocacy push.” I wrote a post a few weeks about Seth Rogen and his charity for Alzheimer’s. I wrote another post a few days later about former North Carolina basketball coach Dean Smith, who has Alzheimer’s. This celebrity advocacy and open conversation about Alzheimer’s is exactly what the Huffington Post article is talking about, and in my opinion, is coming at just the right time. It’s the reason this disease is getting so much attention right now.  

 

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